“But, further, let us examine a little more particularly what sort of people they, in general, are who are converted to Socinianism. It is an object worthy of inquiry, whether they appear to be modest, humble, serious Christians, such as have known the plague of their own hearts; in whom tribulation hath wrought patience, and patience experience; such as know whom they have believed, and have learned to count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus their Lord; such as, in their investigation of sentiments, have been used to mingle earnest and humble prayer with patient and impartial inquiry; such, in fine, as have become little children in their own eyes. If they be, it is a circumstance of consequence, not sufficient, indeed, to justify their change of sentiments, but to render that change an object of attention. When persons of this description embrace a set of new principles, it becomes a matter of serious consideration what could induce them to do so.

But if they be not, their case deserves but little regard. When the body of converts to a system are mere speculatists in religion, men of little or no seriousness, and who pay no manner of attention to vital and practical religion, it reflects neither honour on the cause they have espoused, nor dishonour on that which they have rejected. When we see persons of this stamp go over to the Socinian standard, it does not at all surprise us: on the contrary, we are ready to say, as the apostle said of the defection of some of the professors of Christianity in his day, “They went out from us, but they were not of us.”

Excerpt From “The Calvinistic and Socinian Systems Examined and Compared”, 1802

Fuller, Andrew,  The Works of Andrew Fuller. Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 2007.